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Leaving California and Moving to Texas

by | Selling

 

Where did these new Texans come from? California, Florida, Louisiana, Oklahoma, New York

If you’re living in California and considering a move to Texas you probably want to know how the quality of life in California vs. Texas compares.  Recently The University of Texas at Austin and Stanford University released a joint study comparing the differences that will give you some insight you’re probably looking for. In this video I’m going to go over the key points in this study as well as some other more personal take away from people who have recently made this move. So… let’s dive in.

 

In the last few years we’ve seen a larger number of people moving from California to Texas. However, it hasn’t been enough people moving to impact the California real estate market, vacancy rates are still very low, as is inventory of houses for sale, which I think is the image people get from some media headlines,  but it has been a high enough number of people moving that the University of Texas at Austin and Stanford University joined up and did a study on it and here’s how the two states compared.

 

California and Texas are the two most populous states in the county. They are also polar opposites when it comes to point of views on government policies, taxes, regulations and even global pandemic response. Views so opposite that Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has made California part of his campaigning strategy using the motto “Don’t California My Texas!”. 

 

As different as California and Texas are at the core, there are some similarities. According to the study, crime rates and renewable-energy production are similar in both states, however California spends more per capita on police and green energy subsidies. 

 

Texas does have lower state income tax, but higher property taxes.

 

California’s income taxes are much higher and spends 60% more than Texas on a per-resident basis.

 

California spends more per student than Texas, but Texas has a slightly higher graduation rate. 

 

The biggest difference between California and Texas from an economic stand point is the overall cost of living.

 

57.8% of homes in California cost over $500K where as only 7.8% of homes in Texas are over $500k.

 

A Californian moving to Texas has a strong potential of having a better financial quality of life, not everyone who’s made the move is happy about it. An article on online.com outlined one Brett Alders regret of moving his family from California to Texas for work. Brett found that not everything was cheaper in Texas and he found the Texas heat to be oppressive. I think it’s safe to say hot California sunshine is not the same as hot Texas sunshine. 

 

In the article by Brett Alders he also mentions allergies to the trees in Texas being a debilitating problem for many people especially for first few years they’re in Texas. This is not the first time I’ve heard this. I’m not sure if it’s a seasonal problem or year round, but if you’re susceptible to allergies consider yourself warned and take note of the local allergy treatment centers, which I understand are pretty common. 

 

Now, Brett’s regrets are specificity about moving to the Austin area. Texas is a big place and there’s more to Texas than Austin. So if you’re considering a move to TX but not set on a city it’s worth taking a look at one of the other major cities such as Houston, Dallas, or San Antonio.